Recovery book Good to Go

Frank had mentioned this book a while ago and I read and really enjoyed it. Here’s a quick listen with the author. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/02/11/693423729/the-strange-science-behind-the-big-business-of-exercise-recovery

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Yes, I believe @Jackson and I mentioned it in the Q & A podcast # 3 but not entirely sure! This is a great summary. Christie lives above us in Boulder in the little mountain town of Nederland and I used to race with her husband. I still want to read the book in its entirety!

@FRANK it was really interesting and I would love to get your opinion on the tracking devices. She brings those up in the last chapters and the people she consulted are stating they aren’t telling us anything. HRV is still a really big unknown. SPO2 tells us nothing. Which is interesting to me since the Biostrap has it set as a big penatly when giving you a sleep score. She really concludes. Sleep, eating and reducing stress are the only things that science back’s up to this point. The placebo effect is big, even going into foam rolling isn’t doing much more then making us feel better, so we believe it’s working. She mentioned in that podcast a book called Thirst: A story of redemption that I’m interested in reading. She goes into this in her book as well. Stating we are all actually more likely seeing issues with hyponatremia then being dehydrated. Some of the deaths in marathons have be associated with the former, but none with the latter. The bad thing is the symptoms for both are the same. I picked up the book from my local library and it also had the book on Thirst.

forgot to mention my favorite thing she debunked and something I always felt like a marketing scam. The 30 minute window to get in food after exercise. This would only be a concern if you are doing multiple events in the same day. If you’re not then eating normally through out the day to refuel will be good enough to be ready for the next day.